By Meghan Rimol, Gartner.

Despite the confusion and hype that continues to surround cloud computing, CIOs should understand the top myths about cloud that persist in 2020.

Myths continue to plague cloud computing. These misconceptions can slow enterprises down, impede innovation and stoke fear. Although cloud computing has become much more mainstream in the last five years, some of the myths that circulated during its advent still persist today. New myths have entered as well.

“Cloud computing is about capabilities delivered as a service, with a clear boundary between the service provider and the consumer,” says David Smith, Distinguished VP Analyst and Gartner Fellow Emeritus.

Myths continue to plague cloud computing. These misconceptions can slow enterprises down, impede innovation and stoke fear. Although cloud computing has become much more mainstream in the last five years, some of the myths that circulated during its advent still persist today. New myths have entered as well.

“Cloud computing is about capabilities delivered as a service, with a clear boundary between the service provider and the consumer,” says David Smith, Distinguished VP Analyst and Gartner Fellow Emeritus.

 

No. 1: Cloud is always about money

The prevalent myth about the cloud is that it always saves money. This is sometimes the case, but there are many other reasons for migrating to the cloud, the most common of which is for agility.

All business decisions, including those about cloud, are ultimately about money. Even if agility is the ultimate goal, cost is still a concern. Don’t assume you will save money unless you have done the hard work of honestly analyzing your situation.

Utilize total cost of ownership and other models on a case-by-case basis. Segment cloud into use cases. Look beyond cost issues. It is important to ensure that the business does not have unrealistic cost saving expectations that aren’t delivered upon.

 

No. 2: You have to be cloud to be good

Are you “cloud-washing?” Cloud-washing, or the tendency to call things cloud that are not, may be accidental and a result of legitimate confusion. But IT organizations and vendors call many things cloud as part of their efforts to gain funding, make sales, and meet ill-defined cloud demands and strategies. This results in the myth that an IT product or service must be cloud to be good.

Rather than relying on cloud-washing, call things what they are. Many other capabilities, such as automation and virtualization, are strong enough to stand on their own.

 

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Publié le 15 janvier 2020